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Puncture Wounds

Equine Puncture Wounds

Horses are notorious for hurting themselves or injuring other members of their herd, and the resultant puncture wounds are common problems for horsemen. Whether it’s caused by running into a fence post, stepping on a left-behind roofing nail, or getting kicked in the chest by a flailing shod hoof, a puncture wound on your horse can be a breeding ground for a major infection by staphylococcus, pseudomonas, and streptococcus bacteria, and requires immediate horse wound care. Our revolutionary new treatment Silverquine® is manufactured to help you care for your horse whenever accidents happen.

Puncture Wounds Symptoms

A puncture wound is delineated from other scrapes and scratches by its depth. Typically, a foreign object has penetrated past the first layer of skin and gone either into subcutaneous tissue, or even further, down into muscle. The wound may or may not be bleeding depending on the size and location, but it is typically characterized by skin or fatty tissue covering the initial opening. This tissue closing around the wound provides a perfect opportunity for bacteria to flourish.

Note: If your horse has not had his tetanus vaccine within the past year, you need to have that done as soon as possible. Your horse should be revaccinated within 4 weeks to ensure that he doesn’t contract the disease. 

Whether the injury is bleeding or not, you will need to rinse any dirt or debris out of the wound as quickly as possible with either sterile saline or clean, running water. You can gently clean the injury with Betadine soap or Chlorhexidine soap to remove any leftover debris, and to kill any bacteria on the outside of the wound. Rinse the soap off thoroughly with cold, running water.

Treatment for Puncture Wounds

Equine wound care has been made easy and effective with Silverquine®, our new, ALL NATURAL, water-based topical gel that has been clinically proven to work on equine skin problems. With twice a day applications, you can heal your horse of ringworm, rain rot, thrush and hoof thrush, summer sores, and even treat puncture wounds.

Based on traditional veterinary medicine that used silver to help treat wounds and other infections in animals prior to the invention of modern day antibiotics, Silverquine® contains no alcohol or synthetic chemicals to inhibit stem cell growth or epithelialization – the growth of granular tissue over open wounds.

In addition, our Silverquine® Technology consists of silver nanomolecules (less than .015 micrometers in size) suspended within a water molecule. Our gel has been safety tested and proven more beneficial than silver sulfadiazine cream, a veterinary cream that contains 100 times the amount of silver found in Silverquine®. Silverquine® has even proven so non-toxic that it can be used to treat eye infections in horses without adverse affects.

Don’t wait until your horse becomes tangled in a fence, or decides to play too rough with his herd mates. Be prepared for any wound, skin, eye, or hoof issues all year round, and keep a tube in your equine first aid kit.

To try our new technology, contact Silverquine® at http://www.silverquine.com/contact-us and receive a 4-ounce tube at our special introductory price of only $49.99.